Connect with us

News

Warframe Team Discusses Title’s Success

Published

on

Not many titles have had the sustained success of Warframe, while also staying a bit under the radar.

I played Warframe a few months back, ahead of the release of Destiny 2, and it caught my attention for the time I played it. I plan on going back, once I am done bouncing back and forth between my new Playstation 4 Pro and my new Xbox One X consoles, but I noticed something unique about Warframe.

Mostly, my experience showed that their community is accepting and helpful for new players. This is a sharp contrast to other games, such as Destiny, where more anger gaming is evident.

The team behind Warframe spoke to Polygon about their success, their journey and their community of gamers.

“We kinda made the decision to do this game, and go out on our own and go from the publisher model that we realized was going to shut down the studio,” Geoff Crookes, the art director of Warframe said. “We weren’t getting any publisher interest in our free-to-play game and we didn’t feel like we had enough street cred to do a Kickstarter.”

“We knew we had to convince people with a prototype, and we used that prototype to build our Founder’s Program,” Crookes explained.

“The founders really are responsible for this game being around today; they supported it right from the hop. They saw into what we were doing and helped us grow it.”

Warframe was a slow process, one that relied on winning over gamers who would then recruit their friends to play alongside them.

“I think that the real narrative is that the community and use worked hand-in-hand right from the start to build the game together,” Sheldon Carter, the studio manager of Digital Extremes told Polygon.

“[The first players] were playing this really small bloop of this space ninja raiding game, and they decided they were going to support us, probably because we’ve been really community driven from the get-go,” Carter said. “We were live-streaming, we were interacting with these guys.”

“We didn’t have lofty expectations,” Crookes said. “We were just so excited people were playing it and giving us feedback, they had really cool suggestions that are in line with where we wanted to go, so we said ‘let’s implement this.’ So that weird relationship at the start naturally built this collaborative development relationship that we still have to this day with our community.”

The game, which was originally released in 2013, didn’t overly impress anyone, including IGN:

“Movement and shooting feels smooth and responsive, targets are plentiful, and there’s just enough ragdoll silliness in the enemy death animations to always make me look forward to my next kill.

There’s a good variety of guns to choose from, including a powerful bow that can pin enemies to walls, and although the sci-fi swordsman archetype might be overplayed lately, the melee combat here is also satisfyingly weighty. Charged attacks that can slice enemies clean in half are their own reward.”

The slow start created a challenge for the developers.

“There were a few of us that would look at the numbers every morning and see if we could afford to keep everyone on staff with this project, and it was every morning,” Carter admitted.

“I remember the day when I checked my computer in the morning and I was screaming at home when I saw we had hit a day where, if that day continued, we would be able to support everyone here. We were freaking out.”

A fair monetization system has kept players coming back for more.

“Warframe is the game where essentially everything we have in the game that’s game effecting, you can earn it,” Carter explained.

Carter also touched on the fact that the game is built without the need to compete with other players, which has helped develop the community it has.

“One of the big advantages is that we’re a PvE game, we’re a co-op game,” Carter said in the interview with Polygon.

“You want to work with other players to advance, you’re not against someone. So the feeling that someone has something that looks different than you, there’s no sting to that. Our community turns into people who want to help each other achieve those goals. It really lends itself well to the type of monetization we do.”

“Our community loves the feeling of being able to get that super rare thing by playing the game, but first you have to have the game they love to play and you have to have those loops set up to get the feedback from the community,” Carter said.

“We do have, just to be honest, mod packs that are random, but we say in the description that they’re random,” Carter clarifies. “However in the game you can look in the codex and see specifically which enemy drops that mod, so if there’s a specific mod you’re after you know how you can go after it. So then, even in the situations where there is some randomness in the game, there are ways to kind of understand where that is if that’s the thing you really care about. You can go hunt that enemy for awhile and you’re bound to get it.”

There is a lot more in the interview, which we suggest you read, especially if you have heard of Warframe but haven’t delved into just yet.

Comments

Featured

Gamactica Women Relaunches with New Vision

Published

on

gamactica

Today, Gamactica announced the official relaunch of Gamactica Women, which was one of the first sections added to the social media platform, alongside the Stream Directory.

With a new vision, new direction, and new purpose, Gamactica Women is looking to do something positive and impactful across the gaming and streaming industries. And while it will be similar to other directories on Gamactica, it will also serve as something much more.

According to the official announcement posted on Wednesday morning (via Portals): “Today, I would like to introduce you to Eclipse, which is a section dedicated to creators who create content in mediums such as film, fan films, performances, stand up comedy, and more. With our powerful marketing structure, and our community of creators who create diverse content across a number of platforms, our mission is to create a space for fan film content creatorsindie film creators, and extended content creators that want to build visibility, improve networking, and build more connections within the content creation industry.

Much like our Content Creator Directory (aka the Stream Directory) we will be providing visitors direct access to content creators of this niche within the Gamactica platform, including previews of their work.

While we will be working with creators who make content in all genres, we will be really pushing the horror genre hard, due to our partnership with horror news website Fright Nerd, and the Fright Nerd Podcast which will be making it’s return soon. Through this partnership we will be able to expand on our benefits with exclusive interviews, trailer releases, and more via the Fright Nerd website.”

Gamactica Women is LIVE and accepting applications!

Continue Reading

Featured

Gamactica Unveils New Directory for Military Streamers, Military Content Creators, More

Published

on

gamactica

On Monday, social media platform Gamactica officially announced the launch of a brand new directory and resource hub exclusively geared for Military streamers, content creators, gamers and more!

Gamactica Military will combine the power of the social media platform and their award winning internet marketing structure to provide additional exposure and visibility to active duty and veterans who are working in content creation, advocacy, gaming, esports, and more.

The section will also serve as a resource hub to improve connectivity and networking between different sectors of the industries, specific to those in the military.

“Similar to the Content Creator Directory/Stream Directory, the Military section will be a directory for Military streamers, gamers, Military content creators, as well as brands, stream teams, gaming groups, advocacy groups, non profits, charities and more. It is open to both active duty and veterans” the official announcement stated (according to Portals).

“It is important that, as our platform grows, we continue to evolve and also introduce meaningful sections that can positively impact the industry. Powered by our platform, and our award-winning marketing structure, It is my hope that this better connects the community, and helps create more visibility, more support, and better connectivity for active duty and military creators and brands.”

Check out the new section right here

Continue Reading

Esports

NAVI Releasing Documentary on s1mple

Published

on

s1mple

NAVI is getting set to release a documentary that will follow s1mple’s life and explore his “ups and downs” as one of the most recognizable esports players with insight from former and current teammates, his family, commentators, analysts, and “many others” from the industry.

“I remember the time when we just signed a contract in 2016,” NAVI CEO Yevhen Zolotarov said in an official press release. “Honestly, now it’s hard to believe that it was already five years ago. For the esports industry, five years is quite a long period of time.”

“S1mple is a legend not only for NAVI but for esports in general,” co-founder and CEO of DMarket Vlad Panchenko said. “Therefore, the items that will be dropping during the NAVI watch party stream are also legendary and unique.”

DMarket has created a “unique drop-game” with exclusive items dedicated to s1mple to coincide with the release of the doc, and Natus Vincerewill be premiering a documentary about him on Twitch next month, to celebrate his fifth year with the brand.

Additionally, a NAVI watch party is also set for the doc, set to air on one of their upcoming twitch streams set to take place on September 8th at 11am CT.

Continue Reading

Trending