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Rocket League Patches Eye Optimization For Future

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There is no denying the insanely robust popularity of Rocket League and the momentum it has built.

It’s popularity, which continuing to climb, is proof of that.

Recent patches have two arenas in the game that featured erratic terrain have been removed, replaced by flat fields.

The development team used social studies to gauge player experience and concluded that  the alternate arenas didn’t offer enough strategic differences to offset interfering with player’s muscle memory.

“We didn’t have a strong belief in the future of different layouts given our internal explorations and the mixed success of our ‘Rocket Labs’ arena testing playlist,” Davis said in an email interview with Compete.

“And ultimately we think Rocket League has a lot in common with traditional sports where standards give players and teams the consistency they need to truly master things.”

Players have also noticed a change to car body types. For example, steering and handling are being standardized to fit certain car and represent what that car is expected to do based on it’s build.

“First, our standardization efforts are categorically NOT an attempt to change how a car like Batmobile feels to you” Davis wrote.

“We are not interested in making everything an Octane clone. However, we did want to provide consistency within groups of the most popular vehicles – e.g. Batmobile/Mantis/Twinmill.”

The patches are intended, in part, to create a set of rules for the game as it continues to grow, react to gamer experience and to optimize future car and arena design.

“If this was May 2015 and Rocket League hadn’t released yet I might answer differently [about each car being unique],” wrote Davis.

“But because we’re over two years in and players have become very attached to specific car behaviors like the Batmobile, we aren’t currently interested in trying to take away any of that unique flavor. We’re just trying to bring some of the less used cars into alignment with those favorites.”

 

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Tencent Facing Allegations of Infringing on Mobile Legends: Bang Bang

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Tencent will appear in court on this Tuesday to face allegations of copyright infringement in China, filed by Shanghai-based studio Moonton Technology, according to the South China Morning Post.

Per the report, Tencent is accused of infringing on the rights of Mobile Legends: Bang Bang, one of the biggest mobile titles in Southeast Asia and faces allegations that include rights to authorship, reproduction and communications regarding the game.

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Disco Elysium Lawsuit Alleges ZA/UM CEO Illegally Took Majority Share

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The ongoing battle between partners at Disco Elysium studio ZA/UM has taken another turn as new information has recently surfaced in the dispute between Disco Elysium creatives Robert Kurvitz and Aleksander Rostov and current ZA/UM CEO Ilmar Kompus and former executive producer Tõnis Haavel.

According to the Estonian Ekspress (via PC Gamer):

“the problems began when Margus Linnamäe, who largely financed Disco Elysium and was ZA/UM’s largest shareholder, decided to sell his stake in 2021. There was an expectation that Linnamäe would split his shareholding among the partners, but he allegedly sold it all to Kompus.

Kurvitz and Rostov did not know about this at the time. Their suspicions were raised when they were apparently demoted internally and, after checking the Estonian registration of companies, realised that control of ZA/UM now belonged to Kompus. The pair allegedly began demanding answers, shortly after which they were sacked. Both still own minor shareholdings in ZA/UM.

At the hearing, Kurvitz and Rostov argued that Kompus had used money that should have gone to the studio and shareholders, and funded Disco Elysium’s sequel, in order to buy those $4.8 million sketches. This was the alleged sleight-of-hand.

The shell company Tütreke, controlled by Kompus, somehow acquired these four sketches (described as being for a game called Pioneer One), and allegedly paid exactly one pound sterling for them before re-selling to ZA/UM for €4.8 million. This amount is what was apparently used to buy Linnamäe’s large stake, and put it in the hands of Kompus.”

 

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FTC Reportedly Considering Lawsuit Over Microsoft Activision Deal

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The Federal Trade Commission is reportedly considering filing an antitrust lawsuit against Microsoft’s acquisition of Activision Blizzard and a potential suit could be underway as soon as next month, according to Politico.

Furthermore, the lawsuit may seek to block the record-breaking deal, according to sources in the report who also said that the FTC’s four commissioners are yet to vote on a complaint or meet with lawyers, but the bulk of the investigation has been completed.

A lawsuit is not guaranteed and the FTC has not made any formal announcements at this time.

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