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Gun Media Teases ‘Project Méliès’ But Fans Shouldn’t Show Interest, And Haven’t

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Earlier this week the developers behind ‘Friday the 13th: The Game’ unveiled their next project, ‘Project Melies’, in a teaser trailer and fans have, rightfully so, ripped apart the game and, more specifically, the developers who mishandled the Friday game from launch to it’s unfortunate, and shady, end.

Now, it is true that the gaming community can be toxic at times, and while I am not exactly a fan of people wishing for any company to go belly up, which would result in people losing their jobs, I fully understand the frustration, and outright anger, towards Gun Media, who has acquired worldwide publishing and marketing rights to Bloober Team’s next game.

All you have to do is read through the comments on the internet, for example: Bloody Disgusting, to see how fans view Gun Media, who essentially pissed away Friday the 13th, left gamers feeling ripped off, and used a lawsuit as a scapegoat in a not so subtle way.

And while toxicity can run rampant, this is not the case. Fans are 100% validated, in my view, to feel this way and boycott a developer who burned bridges with a dedicated community.

Without going into the specifics, because you can easily find this all on the internet, Gun Media left a buggy, often times broken game, and took a shady exit to abandon any promises made, since launch, to have a fully working game.

Sure, demands can be excessive, and workload can be daunting, but Gun Media launched a game that was broken for close to 2 months, barely playable unless you were the lucky few. Still, fans stayed loyal, holding on to the promises of fixes, content (remember Paranoia? Uber Jason?, Gredel map?) only to be left in the dust “because of a lawsuit”. One that didn’t sneak up on Gun Media, one that allowed them to make an exit, an exit that allowed them to shrug their shoulders and say “there is nothing we can do, sorry”.

The team behind Gun Media seem like super-fans of Friday the 13th, they also appear to be friendly, and they probably got in way over their head, but it doesn’t excuse the outcome. It doesn’t permit a “pass” on the gamers who feel slighted, ripped off, and angry.

When bad things play out, the fallout is unforgiving, at times.

The way things played out for Friday the 13th: The Game left Gun Media where they are now. On a rough, difficult, and potentially impossible road to a launch of their new game, and future games, hoping that they can convince gamers, some already burned, to reach in their pockets and hand over money, and trust, in another Gun Media title knowing how things played out.

There is no confidence in the brand.

Had Gun Media dropped all the content they promised, prior to the lawsuit, they could have made a better exit, one that would have still upset fans, but would have fulfilled all of the promises they made to their paying supporters.

Gun Media could have bowed out more gracefully, more transparently, and without a shroud of shadiness, allowing them to drop back from creation and focus on fixing the game, dedicated servers, and keeping a healthy community vibrant.

Instead, the bridge was burned. Torched. Atom bombed. And now, new games, that may be good, are going to be likely shunned because when you burn customers as bad as you did, they remember, and they shop elsewhere.

This could have been handled differently, it deserved to be, but it wasn’t. Your new game could have been well received by your Friday community and success could have been more easily obtainable. Instead, we are here.

As someone who runs this website and is a big fan of the Friday game, also a customer, I made the choice not to embed the trailer. If it interests you, it’s easily found on Youtube, or at the above link to Bloody Disgusting. I just didn’t feel right promoting something to our audience from a developer who burned their community, myself included, in the manner that they did.

It’s a shame. This could of all been avoidable.

I won’t be buying, nor trying out any Gun Media associated projects at this time.

But, go ahead Gun Media, keep hawking your “complete edition” Friday the 13th game to the unsuspecting few. They’ll find out soon enough how things operate.

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Tencent Facing Allegations of Infringing on Mobile Legends: Bang Bang

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Tencent will appear in court on this Tuesday to face allegations of copyright infringement in China, filed by Shanghai-based studio Moonton Technology, according to the South China Morning Post.

Per the report, Tencent is accused of infringing on the rights of Mobile Legends: Bang Bang, one of the biggest mobile titles in Southeast Asia and faces allegations that include rights to authorship, reproduction and communications regarding the game.

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Disco Elysium Lawsuit Alleges ZA/UM CEO Illegally Took Majority Share

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The ongoing battle between partners at Disco Elysium studio ZA/UM has taken another turn as new information has recently surfaced in the dispute between Disco Elysium creatives Robert Kurvitz and Aleksander Rostov and current ZA/UM CEO Ilmar Kompus and former executive producer Tõnis Haavel.

According to the Estonian Ekspress (via PC Gamer):

“the problems began when Margus Linnamäe, who largely financed Disco Elysium and was ZA/UM’s largest shareholder, decided to sell his stake in 2021. There was an expectation that Linnamäe would split his shareholding among the partners, but he allegedly sold it all to Kompus.

Kurvitz and Rostov did not know about this at the time. Their suspicions were raised when they were apparently demoted internally and, after checking the Estonian registration of companies, realised that control of ZA/UM now belonged to Kompus. The pair allegedly began demanding answers, shortly after which they were sacked. Both still own minor shareholdings in ZA/UM.

At the hearing, Kurvitz and Rostov argued that Kompus had used money that should have gone to the studio and shareholders, and funded Disco Elysium’s sequel, in order to buy those $4.8 million sketches. This was the alleged sleight-of-hand.

The shell company Tütreke, controlled by Kompus, somehow acquired these four sketches (described as being for a game called Pioneer One), and allegedly paid exactly one pound sterling for them before re-selling to ZA/UM for €4.8 million. This amount is what was apparently used to buy Linnamäe’s large stake, and put it in the hands of Kompus.”

 

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FTC Reportedly Considering Lawsuit Over Microsoft Activision Deal

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The Federal Trade Commission is reportedly considering filing an antitrust lawsuit against Microsoft’s acquisition of Activision Blizzard and a potential suit could be underway as soon as next month, according to Politico.

Furthermore, the lawsuit may seek to block the record-breaking deal, according to sources in the report who also said that the FTC’s four commissioners are yet to vote on a complaint or meet with lawyers, but the bulk of the investigation has been completed.

A lawsuit is not guaranteed and the FTC has not made any formal announcements at this time.

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